You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Food chain’ tag.

Remove one network edge and see what happens. Then, two… etc. This is the first illustration on Mark BuchananNexus: Small-worlds and the ground-breaking science of networks” 2002 book – Norton, New York (Prelude, page 17), representing a portion of the food web for the Benguela ecosystem, located off the western coast of South Africa (from Peter Yodzis). For a joint review of 3 general books in complex networks, including Barabási‘s “Linked“, Duncan WattsSmall-Worlds” and Buchanan‘s “Nexus” pay a visit into JASSSJournal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, ‘a review of three books’ entry by Frédéric Amblard (link).

Excerpt – “Dartmouth and the Liberating Arts“: […] Crucially, Deming (Edward Deming) then argued that this indispensable foundation of trust and shared commitment must be allied to a rigorous understanding of how complex systems work to produce desired results. (…) two sides of the educational mission set forth by my predecessors, a mission that in this historical moment is more vital than ever: on the one hand, the passionate commitment to making the world a better place; on the other, the practical understanding of complex systems required to deliver solutions on a global scale. Passion and practicality: Either without the other will be inadequate to tackle the challenges we face today. […] Jim Yong Kim, “Passion and Practicality: Dartmouth and the Liberating Arts“, new President at Dartmouth Univ.  at his inaugural address, Dartmouth Speeches, Sept. 2009.

Allow me to give you a starter. Albeit this is only the beginning. There is much more at stake over this 1 hour and 15 minutes movie drama documentary: […] Did you read that the Japanese will be watching what’s going to be happening with American teenagers over the next 20 years, … and then they are going to decide to introduce GMO’s (Genetically Modified Organisms) into their food? […]

Alternately teasing and terrifying, STRANGE CULTURE molds one man’s tragedy into an engrossing narrative. In 2004, Steve Kurtz (Thomas Jay Ryan), an associate professor of art at the State University of New York, Buffalo, was preparing an exhibition on genetically modified food for the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art when his wife, Hope (Tilda Swinton), died in her sleep of heart failure. But when paramedics noticed petri dishes and other scientific paraphernalia in the home, they alerted the F.B.I.; within hours Mr. Kurtz found himself suspected of bioterrorism, his home quarantined and his wife’s body removed for autopsy. Filmmaker Lynn Hershman-Leeson bends the nonfiction form to her own unconventional will. The result is a fascinating collage of re-enactments, news clips and interviews, illuminating not only the implications of corporate meddling in the food chain but the ease with which innocent civilian behavior can become a suspicious act. [Text from the YouTube movie synopsis here]

… meanwhile, … at the bottom of our food chains everything seems to be blooming. Here recently over the Atlantic within Spain (south) and France (east) at the bay of Biscay. Plankton (phyto-plankton and zoo-plankton) are some of the most important living things on planet Earth. Phyto-plankton absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen and are at the foundation of the food chain, followed by zoo-plankton. Plankton blooms are so massive that they are visible from space (image from NASA’s Visible Earth).

[...] People should learn how to play Lego with their minds. Concepts are building bricks [...] V. Ramos, 2002.

@ViRAms on Twitter

Archives

Blog Stats

  • 254,865 hits